Berlin Summer Courses for physiologically-psychologically healthy pianism

H

hodonnell

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Guten Abend.
Sie sind herzlich zum Sommerkurs: "Berlin Summer Courses for physiologically-psychologically healthy pianism" eingeladen.

Eine genaue Beschreibung des Kurses finden Sie hier (auf englisch).


Weitere Information (auch auf englisch):


Piano pedagogy often relies heavily on teaching traditions developed throughout the 19th century that focus on subjecting a student to a rigorous program of study, requiring endless (and often mindless) repetition, uncritical adherence to a prescribed system of musical values, and the potential of engaging in harmful psychological mechanisms of stifling interdependence between the teacher and student. Traditional pedagogy can also place excessive strain on the body by engaging in physiologically unhealthy practices.

My pedagogical work seeks to identify more effective methods of helping pianists of varying abilities and levels of commitment develop, in order to achieve a level of competence that helps them realize their musical potential and provides a sense of personal fulfillment through the process of learning music. A central theme of the lessons is the process of translating a musical intention into a corresponding physical gesture, or, in other words, finding the embodiment of a musical idea. In the lessons, I concentrate on using imagery to identify processes that take place in the mechanics of playing, from the interconnectivity of chains of muscles, tendons, fascia and bones connecting the finger tips through to the arms and back, to cognitive processes of input and feedback. The learning process can be identified as an ever-increasing and acute psychological and physical self-awareness coupled with an equally expanding strength of imagination for musical expression. This aspect of self-awareness can be developed by a deepened understanding of the mechanics of the mind and body. The musical imagination can be developed by contact with a wide array of music as well as other types of creative expression. It also grows through an unencumbered empathetic and sympathetic relationship to the emotional content in music.

I seek to convey these ideas with simple and understandable imagery geared to the individual student. The summer courses will be taught in group lessons, working with one student while other students observe and provide feedback. In addition to playing for each other, we will spend some time watching videos of great pianists, identifying aspects of their playing mechanism that may have helped or hindered their musical intentions. The atmosphere of the summer course will open, productive, and collegial. The course is intended for young pianists ages 15 to 30 , especially those who are struggling with physical or psychological blockages in their playing. Piano teachers and amateurs are also welcome to participate in the courses. Course languages: English and German


American pianist and pedagogue Heather O'Donnell’s career spans over fifteen years as a performing musician, teacher, and curator. Recently her focus has shifted from performing to researching new insights into music pedagogy. She is involved in studies in physiology, anatomy, cognition, memory, processes of learning, developmental psychology, historical musical pedagogy, and therapeutic applications of music.
Her interdisciplinary work was profiled in a radio documentary for Deutschlandfunk, “Keys, Hands, Neural Networks. The pianist Heather O’Donnell.” She maintains an active teaching studio in Berlin, serves on the jury of international competitions, and is pursuing a degree in psychology at the Freie Universität in Berlin.

Mit freundlichen Grüßen,
Heather O'Donnell
 
pppetc

pppetc

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Dito -

Sosehr ich Kluge schätze (und ich hatte das Glück, ihm zu
begegnen), so sehr weiß ich doch, daß er von Vielem ne
Ahnung hatte, vom Klavierspiel allerdings nicht allzuviel.

Ich frag mich halt, wieso man zum Ligeti-Spielen Noten
brauchen sollte - Cecil Taylor hatte das seinerzeit auch
ohne Noten (and without Ligeti) hingekriegt.

Also: Klavierspielen mit Noten-Lesen ohne Verletzungen
von irgendwas: Wie geht das? Lernt man das bei Ihnen?

Mit neugierigem Gruß

stephan
 
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rolf

rolf

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Piano pedagogy often relies heavily on teaching traditions developed throughout the 19th century that focus on subjecting a student to a rigorous program of study, requiring endless (and often mindless) repetition, uncritical adherence to a prescribed system of musical values, and the potential of engaging in harmful psychological mechanisms of stifling interdependence between the teacher and student. Traditional pedagogy can also place excessive strain on the body by engaging in physiologically unhealthy practices.

it´s really astonishing!
if 19th century traditions (of playing the piano) are wrong and maybe dangerous - why the hell is piano music of the 19th century wonderful?? ...and why had all those 19th century guys like Chopin and Liszt (and their students) been able to play 19th century piano music without any health problems?...
 
pppetc

pppetc

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if 19th century traditions (of playing the piano) are wrong and maybe dangerous - why the hell is piano music of the 19th century wonderful?? ...and why had all those 19th century guys like Chopin and Liszt (and their students) been able to play 19th century piano music without any health problems?...

Das könnste Dich ma selbst fragen - und das wär really astonishing!
 
Destenay

Destenay

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Guten Abend.
Sie sind herzlich zum Sommerkurs: "Berlin Summer Courses for physiologically-psychologically healthy pianism" eingeladen.

Eine genaue Beschreibung des Kurses finden Sie hier (auf englisch).







Weitere Information (auch auf englisch):


Piano pedagogy often relies heavily on teaching traditions developed throughout the 19th century that focus on subjecting a student to a rigorous program of study, requiring endless (and often mindless) repetition, uncritical adherence to a prescribed system of musical values, and the potential of engaging in harmful psychological mechanisms of stifling interdependence between the teacher and student. Traditional pedagogy can also place excessive strain on the body by engaging in physiologically unhealthy practices.

My pedagogical work seeks to identify more effective methods of helping pianists of varying abilities and levels of commitment develop, in order to achieve a level of competence that helps them realize their musical potential and provides a sense of personal fulfillment through the process of learning music. A central theme of the lessons is the process of translating a musical intention into a corresponding physical gesture, or, in other words, finding the embodiment of a musical idea. In the lessons, I concentrate on using imagery to identify processes that take place in the mechanics of playing, from the interconnectivity of chains of muscles, tendons, fascia and bones connecting the finger tips through to the arms and back, to cognitive processes of input and feedback. The learning process can be identified as an ever-increasing and acute psychological and physical self-awareness coupled with an equally expanding strength of imagination for musical expression. This aspect of self-awareness can be developed by a deepened understanding of the mechanics of the mind and body. The musical imagination can be developed by contact with a wide array of music as well as other types of creative expression. It also grows through an unencumbered empathetic and sympathetic relationship to the emotional content in music.

I seek to convey these ideas with simple and understandable imagery geared to the individual student. The summer courses will be taught in group lessons, working with one student while other students observe and provide feedback. In addition to playing for each other, we will spend some time watching videos of great pianists, identifying aspects of their playing mechanism that may have helped or hindered their musical intentions. The atmosphere of the summer course will open, productive, and collegial. The course is intended for young pianists ages 15 to 30 , especially those who are struggling with physical or psychological blockages in their playing. Piano teachers and amateurs are also welcome to participate in the courses. Course languages: English and German


American pianist and pedagogue Heather O'Donnell’s career spans over fifteen years as a performing musician, teacher, and curator. Recently her focus has shifted from performing to researching new insights into music pedagogy. She is involved in studies in physiology, anatomy, cognition, memory, processes of learning, developmental psychology, historical musical pedagogy, and therapeutic applications of music.
Her interdisciplinary work was profiled in a radio documentary for Deutschlandfunk, “Keys, Hands, Neural Networks. The pianist Heather O’Donnell.” She maintains an active teaching studio in Berlin, serves on the jury of international competitions, and is pursuing a degree in psychology at the Freie Universität in Berlin.

Mit freundlichen Grüßen,
Heather O'Donnell

Je suis désolée, mais je ne comprends pas:confused::rolleyes::D

All best wishes

Destenay
 
Tastenjunkie

Tastenjunkie

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Wahrscheinlich war es schon immer so, dass falsche Unterrichtsmethoden (im Sinne von überambitioniertem "Drill") zum Teil gesundheitsschädigende Verkrampfungen produzieren, die dann irgendwann hemmend auf das Fortschreiten wirken. Solche Verkrampfungen zu lösen mit welcher Herangehensweise auch immer ist doch eine tolle Sache, wenn's funktioniert.

Ich unterstelle allerdings mal ganz bösartig, dass ein solches Kursangebot bestimmt auch den einen oder anderen halbmotivierten Freizeitpianisten ansprechen könnte, der sich davon die mangels Übedisziplin bisher ausgebliebenen enormen Fortschritte verspricht, ohne sich dafür anstrengen zu müssen.

Duck...und...weg...
 

Dreiklang

Dreiklang

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Tja - so leicht ist es, Menschen glücklich zu machen ;)
 
rolf

rolf

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Tja - so leicht ist es, Menschen glücklich zu machen ;)
z.B. ein Mensch, dem das Händchen wehe tut, wenn er Rachmaninov trommelt: dieser Mensch wird glücklich sein, wenn ihm irgendwo dazu verholfen wird, künftig Rachmaninov ohne wehe tuendes Händchen zu trommeln :D:D

aber wohin soll dieser Mensch sich wenden?
zu Frau Taubman?
zu Herrn Feuchtwanger?
zum Sommerkurs dieses Fadens?
zum Physiotherapeuten?
zum magischen Wunderschamanen?

...Fragen über Fragen...
 
Dreiklang

Dreiklang

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aber wohin soll dieser Mensch sich wenden?

Am besten an jemand, der sich mit sowas auskennt, und vom Fach ist (und schon ein paarmal diese spezifischen Probleme behandeln durfte. Ein wenig Ahnung vom Klavierspiel ist dringend anzuraten)

Spaßeshalber könnte man auch mal zum


gehen. Aber Lachen bzw. Losprusten bitte erst nach der Behandlung dann :cool::D
 
Destenay

Destenay

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z.B. ein Mensch, dem das Händchen wehe tut, wenn er Rachmaninov trommelt: dieser Mensch wird glücklich sein, wenn ihm irgendwo dazu verholfen wird, künftig Rachmaninov ohne wehe tuendes Händchen zu trommeln :D:

aber wohin soll dieser Mensch sich wenden?
zu Frau Taubman?
zu Herrn Feuchtwanger?
zum Sommerkurs dieses Fadens?
zum Physiotherapeuten?
zum magischen Wunderschamanen?

...Fragen über Fragen...

das beste Rezept ist immer noch sich in die Brennneseln zu setzten, wer das nicht mag! esse jeden Tag 50 Gramm.:D:D:D
 
 

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